Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Foliage


Sculpturally rich in architectural shape & form.

Replete with decadent and ostentatious coloration.


Gardeners with an eye towards detail are captivated

with wild infactuation with foliage plants

and overindulge in their tactile exuberance.


Who could resist pairing the vividly striped spiky red foliage of

Phormium The Guardsman with the big bold yellow and

green zebra striped leaves of Canna Bengal Tiger ?


From Pina Colada


Photo by Marion Brenner for Garden Design Magazine

Derviss Design

From Container Plantings


A container planting supports a variety of textures, shapes and forms of foliage.

Derviss Design

From New Album 6/2/09 4:27 PM


Contrasting colors and forms united together poolside.

Pennisetum rubra, lysimachia, glechoma and variegated strawberry

Derviss Design

From Container Plantings


Textural low maintenance entry :

Tree fern, agave attenuatta, lysimachia, succulents, alocasia + heuchera

Derviss Design

From Container Plantings


The west coast master of Sexy Savory Foliage Gardens : David Feix

From Bromeliad Society Tour 2008


David Feix Design

From Bromeliad Society Tour 2008


David Feix Design

From Bromeliad Society Tour 2008


David Feix Design

From Bromeliad Society Tour 2008


Simplicity of upright reeds. Equisetum

Derviss Design

From Container Plantings


Carex, choysia, lamium ,black mondo , chondropetalum and phormium :

Derviss Design

From portfolioMay08.jpg


From Paths


My garden, preparing for a tour on a rainy spring day:

From Outdoor Room


Succulents at front entry , Photo by Lee Anne white for Fine Gardening magazine

Derviss Design

From Pina Colada


Pagoda style succulent

From Bromeliad Society Tour 2008


A spikey tillandsia growing out of an Ensete ventricosum Maurelii

with a plectranthus caressing the trunk of the red banana.

Derviss Design

From Pina Colada



San Francisco garden show 2008 - Best in Show ,Golden Gate Cup, APLD , Gold medal awards .

Foreground planter :succulents and carex, Midground - bromeliad surrounded by oxalis and succulents, Background bamboo

Derviss Design

From San Francisco Garden Show 2008


* This essay was originally written for inclusion with the Gardeners Roundtable Colloquim,

but upon reflection I have decided to withdraw my inclusion with the group.

An educated woman should be able to speak on what ever subject she chooses whether it be

politics , religion or poo dunk garden design.


Censorship is the antithesis to expressionism in art.



11 comments:

Christine said...

Beautiful eye candy, as usual! Tucking a Bromeliad or two amongst the taller plants makes for great textural tapestry and I love that Crassula...

danger garden said...

Fabulous essay and luscious photos, I felt like I could walk right in and fondle the foliage on many of them.

Jocelyn H. Chilvers said...

Thanks for the beautiful and inspiring photos. The lush foliage juxtaposed with the hardscape elements is just so...rich! Love it!

Genevieve said...

Michelle, we all wanted you to stay and keep on speaking your mind; any upset was caused by the fact that you did not sign your name to your comments and posted to the Facebook page as "the Garden Designer's Roundtable" instead of "Michelle Derviss".

I don't want you to be building this up into a "thing" when it's not. You're welcome back anytime, just sign your name if you're going to call someone Palin-esque so they know who to rebut.

In any case - a nice discussion of foliage and the photos are, as always, exquisite.

Deviant Deziner, aka Michelle said...

Genevieve,
Thanks for your note, but it did not withdraw from the Roundtable due to the name signing facebook badge thing.

I tend to gravitate towards small groups of people who I know very well and respect.

I felt the group was a bit too large for me and whose points of perspective I did not share, ( especially that repugnant momma knows best comment).

I find censorship unattractive .

Joycelyn, Thanks for stopping it and saying hello.

Loree, Don't you just love lush foliage. Speaking of foliage I need to get that Furcrea out to you asap !
doh !

Christine, thanks for plant name, " Crassula" ! , I had forgotten it. Isn't is a looker !
Tonight is the monthly bromeliad society meeting in S.F. and I hope to swap a few broms with other gardeners !

phrago said...

Hey Michelle (you rebel!), I love the pic with the tree fern in the pot. Haven't had one of those monsters in a while. Nice Pics as always...
Not to be a pest but your page link is still acting up. I just got sent to "Let them eat cake" when I pushed the garden porn link at the top of the comments page while leaving your MG Article, which was very cool! Also, the Google link and the link in the "friends of Garden Rant" sent me to the "Cake" article. Yesterday the garden Rant link was working Okay, so I am not sure what's happening but I thought I would tell you... Chow

Deviant Deziner, aka Michelle said...

Patrick,
Thanks for the info.
I don't know how to fix the link things.
Maybe I will tinker with the blog attributes again, but I suspect that is what is causing the problems in the first place - my tinkering !
doh !
thanks again though, appreciated.
michelle

ScottHokunson said...

Michelle,

Simply amazing pictures. Time to start 'Garden Porn' the Magazine, sign me up! I love the Equisetum in the red planters, simple and elegant!

danger garden said...

Garden Porn the magazine!! Would it come in a brown wrapper?

No worries on the Furcrea Michelle, whenever! Seriously! Would you care for a tiny Agave desmettiana?

phrago said...

Howdy Michelle, The link, it's Working!!!! Oh, And I third the magazine idea, which could be cyber shiped for an instant download or print. Maybe Amazon will pick you up for the Kindell. But, you should have a different name for the mag and use your last name in the title. How about just plain

"DERVISS"

Sounds Classy... Patrick

Design Resource said...

Your talent is amazing (and your nerve a close second!LOL!) I am so inspired by your work- thanks for sharing it so freely and challenging the rest of us to think outside the box.